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Algonquin Park Birding Report

Hooded Mergansers in Algonquin Park

Algonquin Park Birding Reports provide visitors with species observed in recent days within Algonquin Park. Reports are compiled by Ron Tozer. We would greatly appreciate your Algonquin Park bird sightings. Please contact us with your recent sightings.

More About the Birds of Algonquin Park

Birds of Algonquin ParkBirds of Algonquin Park authored by retired Algonquin Park Naturalist Ron Tozer presents detailed accounts of all 278 birds known to have occurred in Algonquin Park. The book includes information on migration timing, nesting habits and behaviour of the 144 breeding species, winter occurrence, historical records and population trends. The influence of climate warming on the arrival and departure time of migrants, and the declining numbers of many species are discussed. This 480-page masterpiece filled with illustrations and images is available for purchase online or at any of The Friends of Algonquin Park stores.


Algonquin Park Wild Bird Cam - Live Stream!

Algonquin Park Wild Bird CamThe Friends of Algonquin Park is offering live streaming views of the feeders at the Algonquin Park Visitor Centre, during day and night. Wildlife monitoring activities are expected to continue at the feeders until March 31, but warmer weather conditions may end operations sooner. Tune in to see what is active at the Algonquin Park Wild Bird Cam.


January 7, 2021

Male Spruce Grouse in Algonquin Park.

Image: Male Spruce Grouse in Algonquin Park. Photo by Jim Richards.

This report covers the last two weeks (December 25 to January 7) and includes resident boreal species plus winter finches.

  • Spruce Grouse – one was noted at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 2 and 3.

  • Black-backed Woodpecker – observed along Spruce Bog Boardwalk (December 31 and January 2), along the Highland Backpacking Trail between Highway 60 and the Madawaska River (January 2), and in the Pog Lake area (January 2).

  • Canada Jay – reported at Mew Lake Campground, south side of the Old Airfield, Beaver Pond Trail, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road at and north of the winter gate, and along the Logging Museum trail.

  • Boreal Chickadee – one reported from the conifers along the south side of the Old Airfield (January 1 to 3) and one observed along the Blackfox Lake portage which starts at the Trailer Sanitation Station (January 2).

  • Pine Grosbeak – small numbers were noted along Highway 60 (especially in the morning) and along the trails.

  • Common Redpoll – only a few reported now.

  • Red Crossbill – reports of a few from Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Mew Lake Campground.

  • White-winged Crossbill – observations of 1 or 2 at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road north of the winter gate, and the north side of the Old Airfield.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


December 24, 2020

Canada Jay in Algonquin Park. Photo by Michael Runtz.

Image: Canada Jay in Algonquin Park. Photo by Michael Runtz.

This report covers the last two weeks (December 11 to 24) and mentions resident boreal species plus winter finches. Limited numbers of observers were present and so comments are based on relatively few records.

  • Spruce Grouse – no reports; try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

  • Black-backed Woodpecker – observed along Spruce Bog Boardwalk (December 13 and 22).

  • Canada Jay – reported at Mew Lake Campground, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road at and north of the winter gate, and along the Logging Museum trail.

  • Boreal Chickadee – one reported from the conifers between the south side of the Old Airfield and the Madawaska River near the bike trail bridge (December 16 and 20).

Finches were noted less frequently and in lower numbers than during the previous two-week period.

  • Pine Grosbeak – flocks of 2 to 8 reported at the Old Airfield; the highway just east of Lake of Two Rivers; and the Logging Museum.

  • Common Redpoll – small flocks were observed at the Old Airfield and along the highway near Lake of Two Rivers.

  • Red Crossbill – about 15 were near the entrance to Spruce Bog Boardwalk (December 13) and a flock of 8 was at the Visitor Centre (December 21).

  • White-winged Crossbill – two were observed feeding on spruce seeds on the south side of the Old Airfield near the bike trail bridge over the Madawaska River (December 16).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


December 10, 2020

Boreal Chickadee in Algonquin Park

Image: Boreal Chickadee in Algonquin Park. Photo by Lev Frid.

This report covers the last two weeks (November 27 to December 10) and mentions species that birders frequently come to Algonquin Park to see during the winter. Gates on Opeongo Road at the Cameron Lake Road junction and at the start of Arowhon Road are now closed for the winter. The Visitor Centre has three feeders in operation now, two in the parking lot and one below the viewing deck. A Pine Marten and a Ruffed Grouse came to get fallen sunflower seeds below the feeder visible from the viewing deck today.

  • Spruce Grouse – a male was seen between the river and the north edge of the Old Airfield, near the parking lot (December 5) and one was at Spruce Bog Boardwalk (December 8).

  • Black-backed Woodpecker – observed along Highway 60 near Cache Lake Marsh (November 29); on Opeongo Road near the winter gate (December 6); and along Spruce Bog Boardwalk (December 7).

  • Canada Jay – reported regularly at Mew Lake Campground, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road at and north of the winter gate, and at the Logging Museum.
  • Boreal Chickadee – the first reports since mid-October were one along the Barron Canyon Road near Ignace Lake on the Park’s “East Side” (December 6), and one photographed (see above) in a flock of Black-capped Chickadees between the south edge of the Old Airfield and the river (December 7). The latter bird could not be re-found during an extensive search on December 8 but is likely still in the area. Listen for its vocalizations and search among any other chickadees encountered there.

Likely due to the very limited tree seed crops here, winter finch numbers declined significantly during the last two weeks.

  • Evening Grosbeak – no reports.

  • Pine Grosbeak – small numbers continue to be seen, with birds along the Highway 60 margin being noted more often during the first two hours of morning light.

  • Common Redpoll – the last reports were single birds near Park Lake and Cache Lake (November 29).

  • Red Crossbill – small numbers were seen irregularly along Highway 60 during the period, and along Barron Canyon Road on December 6.

  • White-winged Crossbill – a few were reported on Mizzy Lake Trail (December 3) and at Mew Lake (December 8).

  • Pine Siskin – one heard at the Old Airfield (December 7) was the only report.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


November 26, 2020

Image: Male Black-backed Woodpecker. Photo by Lev Frid

Image: Male Black-backed Woodpecker. Photo by Lev Frid.

There were fewer birds and fewer birders during the last two weeks compared to earlier this month. Persisting snow cover arrived (November 22). The Opeongo Road winter gate was still open as of yesterday. The Visitor Centre feeders are not operating yet but are expected to be soon.

  • Spruce Grouse – A male was photographed along Spruce Bog Boardwalk (November 20).

  • Black-backed Woodpecker – Observed along Mizzy Lake Trail and Spruce Bog Boardwalk (November 20).

  • Canada Jay – Reported at Mizzy Lake Trail, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road north of the winter gate.

  • Boreal Chickadee – No sightings. The only reports this fall were singles at the long boardwalk on Bat Lake Trail (September 21) and Opeongo Road at the parking lot near the winter gate (October 18).

  • Bohemian Waxwing – A few continue to be observed, including three at the Old Airfield (November 15) and one at the Visitor Centre (November 22).

  • Evening Grosbeak – No reports.

  • Pine Grosbeak – Small numbers continued to be seen, with birds along Highway 60 being noted more often in the early morning.

  • Common Redpoll – A few reported regularly, mostly as heard flyovers.

  • Red Crossbill – Reported on four days (November 15 to 26), with highest number at one location being 16. Look for crossbills along Highway 60 in the early morning.

  • White-winged Crossbill – Reported on two days (November 15 to 26), with highest number at one location being 6.

  • Pine Siskin – Single reported along Mizzy Lake Trail (November 20).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


November 14, 2020

Male Pine Grosbeak in Algonquin Park

Image: Bohemian Waxwings. Photo by Lev Frid.

Following is an overview of some species recently reported from Algonquin Park that are often sought by birders here.

  • Spruce Grouse – reported along Mizzy Lake Trail (November 5) and Spruce Bog Boardwalk (November 6, 8 and 9).

  • Black-backed Woodpecker – observed along Mizzy Lake Trail (November 5 and 9), Beaver Pond Trail at posts 4 and 8 (November 9) and at Park Lake (November 9).

  • Canada Jay – reported during last week at Mizzy Lake Trail, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road, and Logging Museum Trail.

  • Boreal Chickadee – last reported in August. The southern edge of its Ontario breeding range appears to be receding northward; climate warming is a likely but not yet proven contributing cause.

  • Bohemian Waxwing – one or two small flocks along Highway 60 reported on several days during the last two weeks but not persisting at any location. Thirty were seen in Whitney (November 6).

  • Evening Grosbeak – a few flyovers heard regularly; present at the Visitor Centre fairly often although feeders are not in operation.

  • Pine Grosbeak – observed fairly regularly but in small numbers at various locations, including Highway 60 margin; flyovers are often detected by calls.

  • Common Redpoll – small numbers regularly observed along Highway 60, often feeding on weed seeds; most reports involve calling flyovers. Indicative of low numbers were a total of 36 during several hours at Lake Travers on the Park’s “East Side” (November 12).

  • Red Crossbill – reported on just five days in November so far, with highest number at one location being 10.

  • White-winged Crossbill – reported on just five days in November so far, with highest number at one location being 20.

  • Pine Siskin – single November report: one at Mizzy Lake Trail (November 5)

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


Related Information

 

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Special regulations for Algonquin's special fishery.